Monday, April 16, 2012

Family Relations


Inbal Doron

The family unit is undergoing a process of transformation in the modern world. In recent years the public debate surrounding this process and its potential implications for various aspects of society has been increasing. In this context, some interesting statistics regarding the population of Jerusalem are presented here.

According to data of the Central Bureau of Statistics from the end of 2009, a total of 66% of the city’s population (aged 20 and above) were married, whereas 23% were single, 6% were divorced, and 5% were widowed. The percentage of married individuals aged 20 and above in Jerusalem was comparable to the figure for Israel (63%) and much higher than the figure for Tel Aviv (46%). The data indicate that Jerusalemites marry at a young age. Among those aged 20-34 in Jerusalem, about 53% were married (compared to 28% in Tel Aviv). Interestingly, 9% of all married residents of the city were wed before age 24, compared to 4% in Israel and only 1.5% in Tel Aviv.

Divorce rates in Jerusalem were very low. Only 9% of those aged 35 and above in the city were divorced, compared to 16% in Tel Aviv and 14% in Haifa. The percentage of those divorced among the 35+ age group within the Jewish population was higher than the figure for the Arab population: 11% versus 3%, respectively. The percentage of singles within both population groups was identical, at 8%.

According to data of the National Council for the Child from the end of 2010, Jerusalem had 7,900 single-parent families, which included about 14,000 children under age 18. These children accounted for approximately 4% of all the city’s children. This is lower than the figure for Israel, in which 9% of all children belong to single-parent families. In Tel Aviv the percentage of children within single-parent families was especially high, measuring 17%. 





Sources: Analysis of Central Bureau of Statistics data, Statistical Yearbook of the National Council for the Child.

Monday, April 2, 2012

Don't worry be happy

Aviel Yelinek

Many people experience stress or worry at some point in their lives. At times this is a natural reaction of the body as it prepares itself to be tested or to face important events, but in many cases it is a matter of significant emotional overload that could continue for a long time and undermine quality or life or even day-to-day functionality.

The 2010 Social Survey of the Central Bureau of Statistics questioned individuals aged 20 and above about the stress and worry they feel in the course of their daily lives. The questions focused on the feelings of the respondents during the 12 months preceding the survey.

The data reveal that 19% of Jerusalemites frequently felt stressed. This was lower than the figure for Israel (24%), Tel Aviv (26%), and Haifa (35%). A particularly striking statistic is the percentage of Jerusalemites who felt no stress: 39%. This was significantly higher than the figure for Israel (23%), Haifa (21%), and Tel Aviv (15%). Assessment by gender reveals that women tend to feel stress more than men. Among women in Israel, 29% reported that they frequently felt stressed, compared to 19% of men. Likewise, 19% of women reported that they did not feel any stress, compared to 28% of men.

Another interesting question focused on the effect of worry on quality of sleep. The percentage of Jerusalemites who reported that worries frequently disturbed their sleep stood at 11%. This was lower than the figure for Tel Aviv (14%), Israel (15%), and Haifa (20%). Likewise, the percentage of Jerusalemites who reported no sleep disturbances due to worries was 46%, which is higher than the figure for Haifa (41%), Israel (40%), and Tel Aviv (37%). Interestingly, the percentage of women in Israel who reported that worries frequently disturb their sleep measured 17%, which is higher than the figure for men (11%). Accordingly, the percentage of women who reported that their sleep was never disrupted by worries stood at 33%, which lower than the figure for men (48%).



Source: Analysis of Central Bureau of Statistics data