Thursday, January 24, 2013

“All the News That’s Fit to Print”

Lior Lehrs

The printed media throughout the world and in Israel is in a state of crisis these days as a result of developments taking place in the field of communications and on the Internet. At the same time, some argue that it would be premature to eulogize the printed media and that it is still popular and capable of accommodating itself to a changing reality.

According to data of the Central Bureau of Statistics for 2011, 78% of Jerusalemites (age 20 and above) reported that they had read newspapers, magazines, or journals during the previous year. This figure is lower than the national average (84%) or the figures for Tel Aviv (87%), Haifa (88%), and Rishon LeZion (88%). Among Jerusalemites who had read newspapers, 66% reported that they had read newspapers in Hebrew, 26% in Arabic, 4% in Russian and 4% in English. Interesting to point out that the figure of Russian readers in Jerusalem is lower than the national average (9%) but the figure of the English readers is higher than the national average (1%).

What types of articles do Jerusalemites tend to read? Sixty percent of Jerusalemites who had read newspapers responded that they tend to read articles about news, politics, and current affairs. This figure is lower than the national average (66%) or the figures for Tel Aviv (72%), Haifa (73%), and Rishon LeZion (68%). Among Jerusalem’s newspaper readers, 25% reported that they read articles about economics. This figure is also lower than the national average (30%) or the figures for Tel Aviv (44%), Haifa (37%), and Rishon LeZion (36%). In contrast, the percentage of Jerusalem’s newspaper readers who habitually read articles about the Torah, Judaism, and religion (23%) is higher than the national average (12%) or the figures for Tel Aviv (6%) and Haifa (5%). Moreover, among Jerusalem’s newspaper readers, 25% reported that they read articles about physical and mental health, 15% reported reading articles about sports, and only 4% said that habitually read the gossip columns.

Interestingly, according to data of the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics (PCBS), the percentage of Palestinians in the Jerusalem district (age 10 and above) who reported that they read newspapers (45%) is higher than the figure for the West Bank (39%) or the Gaza Strip (19%). PCBS data also indicates that the percentage of newspaper readers among Palestinian women in the Jerusalem District (47%) is higher than the percentage among Palestinian men in this district (43%). 

Sunday, January 13, 2013

Inter-Generational Education

Eitan Bluer

It is often said that the dream of every Jewish mother is for her children to acquire an education. Yet as it turns out, parental expectations regarding higher education vary, depending on the parents’ own level of education. Evidently, the higher the parents’ level of education, the greater their expectation that their own children will acquire a higher education. In 2011 about 68% of Jerusalem’s parents age 20 and above who had up to 12 years of education (no high school diploma) indicated that they expect their children to earn an academic or other tertiary (post-secondary) degree from an accredited institution. This figure was 75% among parents with a high school diploma, and 80% among parents with a tertiary education. Within Israel as a whole the figures were higher. About 77% of parents with fewer than 12 years of education (no high school diploma) indicated that they expect their children to earn an academic or other tertiary degree. The figures were comparable for parents with a high school diploma (84%) and parents with a tertiary education (85%).

And what about fulfilling the expectations? We would expect to see a positive correlation between the mothers’ and children’s levels of education as well as educational mobility. In 2011, approximately 64% of all Jerusalemites age 20 and above indicated that their mother’s education did not exceed 12 years. In contrast, 25% indicated that their mother had a tertiary education. Among children whose mothers have twelve or fewer years of education, 29% reported having a tertiary education. Among children whose mothers have a tertiary education, this figure stood at 51%.

Regarding educational mobility, it appears that the percentage of children whose level of education exceeds that of their parents is lower for Jerusalem than for Israel. In Jerusalem, 58% of children whose mothers have a secondary education indicated that their own level of education exceeds that of their mothers, whereas for Israel this figure stood at 65%. 




Source: 2011 social survey of the Central Bureau of Statistics